10.01.2014  |   | Subscribe  | Contact us

All News & Blogs

E-mail Alerts

DDT IS GONE, BUT NOT THE POISONS THAT THREATEN US page 2
George Fenwick's op-ed column on "Silent Spring": poisons continue to abound.

 Rodenticides have reduced the numbers of rats, but threaten humans and their pets, too.
Sharon Theimer/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Visit the Photo Place
Date published: 10/7/2012

continued

Hawks, owls, and other raptors, as well as dogs and cats, face gruesome deaths from these rat poisons. Children are poisoned, too. Poison-control centers get 15,000 calls each year because of childhood exposure to rat poisons. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that the unreported child exposure rate may be four times as high.

The $37 billion company behind much of this unnecessary sickness and death is Reckitt Benckiser, maker of familiar household products ranging from Woolite and Lysol to French's Mustard. Reckitt Benckiser has refused calls to protect wildlife, children, and pets by changing the packaging and distribution of its rat poison, d-CON.

In announcing its decision, the EPA stated: "These changes are essential to reduce the thousands of accidental exposures of children that occur every year from rat and mouse control products and also to protect household pets. Today's action will help keep our children and pets safe from these poisons."

Other companies have made the necessary safety improvements prudently prescribed by the EPA. But Reckitt Benckiser continues to sell its poisons as loose pellets and pastes rather than in secure bait stations, and to peddle to residential consumers the most toxic formulations of powerful "second-generation" anticoagulants such as brodifacoum. Two other companies, Spectrum Brands (which, ironically, makes popular pet-care products) and Liphatech, have also refused, continuing to market Hot Shot, Rid-a-Rat, and Generation without the needed safety measures.

By flouting the federal directive, these companies are forcing the government to waste taxpayer dollars in a multi-year process to get the dangerous poisons off the market. While their delay tactics are not illegal, they drain public resources and wreak continued havoc on children, wildlife, and pets. The poison-makers are also gaming the regulatory system to gain an advantage over more ethical competitors such as Bell Laboratories that have done the right thing and complied with the EPA's common-sense order.

The rodenticide issue has become our nation's biggest pesticide fight in more than three decades.

On the 50th anniversary of "Silent Spring," it is sad to see Reckitt Benckiser, Spectrum Brands, and Liphatech take the low road at the expense of America's families, our pets, and our wildlife.


Previous Page  1  2  

DDT IS GONE, BUT NOT THE POISONS THAT THREATEN US

George Fenwick is president of the American Bird Conservancy.