YOUR TOWN:  Caroline | Culpeper | King George | Fredericksburg | Orange | Spotsylvania | Stafford | Westmoreland     TODAY: 10.30.2014 | 

Historic sites : All sites (in town & out)

View MyTour
?
Alexandria
Old Town Alexandria’s historic area offers many adventures. The area also has many shopping options neatly packaged along several blocks of the often-bustline King Street. Walk and shop yourself into a frenzy. Then treat yourself to some gourmet ice cream at the Ben & Jerry's shop at the end of the street. History buffs may want to visit the Waterfront Museum, the Lyceum (center of Alexandria’s heritage and culture), the Carlyle House, Christ Church (regularly attended by George Washington and Robert E. Lee), the George Washington Masonic Memorial and Gadsby’s Tavern.
Site is in MyTour
?

Arlington
Visit historic Fort Myer and Arlington National Cemetery.
Site is in MyTour

Gunston Hall
The home of George Mason, father of the Bill of Rights, is at Lorton, off U.S. 1 on State Route 242.
Site is in MyTour

Morven Park Mansion, Leesburg
A 1,200-acre estate west of Leesburg, was home to two governors. The estate also has the Museum of Hounds and Hunting, a coach house and the Winmillcq Carriage Collection, which displays 25 vehicles including coaches, gigs, a hearse and steam pumper.
Site is in MyTour

Mount Vernon
The home of George Washington is on the bank of the Potomac River, eight miles south of Alexandria. Mount Vernon ( or ) has the most complete set of outbuildings of any museum house today. Now offers a 30-minute river cruise along the Potomac.
Site is in MyTour

Oatlands Mansion, Leesburg
The mansion was built in 1804 by George Carter, the great-grandson of Robert “King” Carter. The mansion is surrounded by four acres of formal gardens.
Site is in MyTour

Woodlawn Plantation
Located three miles west of Mount Vernon, the plantation offers the best of the old and the new. The plantation house was the home of Lawrence Lewis, George Washington's nephew and his wife, Eleanor "Nelly" Custis Lewis, Martha Washington's granddaughter.
Site is in MyTour

Monticello
Thomas Jefferson’s home sits just outside of Charlottesville. Monticello was built by Jefferson over a period of 40 years.
Site is in MyTour

Historic Michie Tavern
Located just below Monticello, the tavern, now a museum and general store, was built about 1784 near Earlysville, dismantled and moved to its present site in 1928.
Site is in MyTour

Ash Lawn–Highland
Located about two miles from the Michie Tavern, this was the home of James Monroe, who moved there at the urging of his friend Thomas Jefferson.
Site is in MyTour

University of Virginia
At U.Va., many tourists stroll the scenic campus. The main stop is the Rotunda, part of the original complex designed by Thomas Jefferson that was the library and hub of student activity when the university opened in 1819.
Site is in MyTour

Winchester
Apple Blossom Festival in April; Belle Grove, headquarters of Union Gen. Phil Sheridan in the Civil War; Burwell Morgan Mill; Confederate Lt. Gen. Thomas J. Stonewall Jackson's headquarters.
Site is in MyTour

Stratford Hall Plantation
This is the ancestral seat of the Lees of Virginia, notably two signers of the Declaration of Independence, and the birthplace of Gen. Robert E. Lee.
Site is in MyTour

Thomas Jefferson's Poplar Forest, Bedford County
This is the home Jefferson designed and used as his personal retreat.
Site is in MyTour

Richmond
Virginia’s capital, 50 miles south of Fredericksburg, features the Edgar Allan Poe Museum, St. John’s Church (where Patrick Henry made his famous “Give me liberty or give me death” speech), the White House of the Confederacy, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, the Valentine Museum, Maymont and the Lewis Ginter Botanical Gardens, among many other attractions. The Carytown shopping district presents dozens of independent shops and restaurants offerent items you won't find anywhere else.
Site is in MyTour

Wakefield
Officially known as George Washington Birthplace National Monument, Wakefield is a 357-acre working farm operated by the National Park Service along the Potomac River and Pope’s Creek.
Site is in MyTour

Williamsburg
Williamsburg offers a 173-acre historic area restored to its 18th-century charm.
Site is in MyTour

Jamestown
The Original Site is run by the National Park Service and includes excavations, exhibits and more.
Site is in MyTour

Montpelier
Former home of President James Madison. Estate of 2,750 acres includes farmland, race courses, a large formal garden, a panoramic landscape, a National Landmark Forest and dozens of buildings.
Site is in MyTour

Luray Caverns
Best known of Virginia’s caverns, Luray is surrounded by the Blue Ridge Mountains and is minutes from the Skyline Drive
Site is in MyTour

Staunton
The Frontier Culture Museum features re-created farms typical of 17th- and 18th-century immigrants to the backcountry of the Upper South and Middle Atlantic region. Open 9 a.m.–5 p.m daily mid-March to Dec. 1; 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Dec. 1 to mid-March.
Site is in MyTour

Center for Creative Arts (Silversmith House)
A free public gallery where local artists can display and sell their works. The gallery is housed in the historic Silversmith house, which dates back to the 1780s
Site is in MyTour

Old Stone Warehouse
This four-story structure on the river dates back to the early 1700s. Some believe it was originally used as a jail. Others say it was a tobacco warehouse.
Site is in MyTour

St. George's Episcopal Church
This church, an example of Romanesque Revival style of architecture, was built in 1849. The clock in the tower, was set in place in 1851.
Site is in MyTour

Fredericksburg Courthouse
This courthouse dates back to 1852. It currently houses the Fredericksburg Curcuit Court.
Site is in MyTour

Presbyterian Church
Dedicated in 1833, the church is now the oldest house of worship in Fredericksburg. It was built using the temple form. The Civil War years brought turmoil and destruction to the church. The church bell was given to the Confederacy to be melted down for guns. During the Battle of Fredericksburg, the church was heavily damaged by Union artillery.
Site is in MyTour

National Bank Museum
Museum covers nearly two centuries of banking history. It is housed in one of the oldest buildings in America serving continuously as a bank.
Site is in MyTour

Hugh Mercer Monument
Bronze statue of Hugh Mercer (by Edward V. Valentine) erected in 1906 by the U.S. Government. In 1761, on the advice of Washington, Mercer opened an apothecary shop in Fredericksburg. Mercer was a general in the Revolutionary War and was killed at the Battle of Princeton in January 12, 1777. His Grandson was Hugh Weedon Mercer, a Confederate General in the Civil War. (source: fredericksburgva.net)
Site is in MyTour

Thomas Jefferson Religious Freedom Monument
Monument commemorates Thomas Jefferson's drafting of the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom. This famous bill established the principle that "no man shall suffer on account of his religious opinions or beliefs." It was later incorporated into the U.S. Constitution as the First Amendment of the Bill of Rights.
Site is in MyTour

Mary Washington grave & monument
President Andrew Jackson laid the cornerstone of the original monument in 1833. Complications halted work on the monument so that by 1862 only its base was completed. The present granite monument, dedicated in 1894 by President Grover Cleveland, was constructed on the site of the original monument to mark the grave of George Washington's mother. The brick wall encloses the Gordon family cemetery. ( source: nps.gov)
Site is in MyTour

Kenmore
The home of Fielding and Betty Washington Lewis (George Washington's sister). Built in the 1770's, this house was part of a plantation of almost 1,300 acres. (Source: kenmore.org)
Site is in MyTour

Fredericksburg City and Confederate Cemetery
Six Confederate generals and more than 3,300 Southern soldiers lie buried there amid quiet, peaceful surroundings; 2,184 of them are unknown.
Site is in MyTour

Virginiana Room
Historical collection at the Central Rappahannock Regional Library's headquarters on Caroline Street in downtown Fredericksburg. Information is available to use in the library only. Call 540/372-1144 for more information.
Site is in MyTour

Jackson Shrine
A frame plantation building where Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson died after being wounded at Chancellorsville.
Site is in MyTour

Sunken Road
Sunken Road which was closed to traffic permanently in August 2004. Work has recently been completed there to restore the road to its Civil-War era appearance. Confederate soldiers fired from behind the stone wall and successfully held off Union troops crossing the Rappahannock River.
Site is in MyTour

Richard Kirkland monument
Monument dedicated to Confederate soldier Richard Kirkland. During the Battle of Fredericksburg on Dec. 13, 1862, Kirkland's unit formed behind the Stone Wall at the base of Marye's Heights and helped slaughter the Union attackers. After a day of severe fighting, the scene shifted from severe fighting to tremendous suffering.
Site is in MyTour

National Cemetery
It is the final resting place for more than 15,000 Union soldiers who died in the Civil War fighting in the Fredericksburg area.
Site is in MyTour

Auction block
This knee-high stone block probably supported the feet of slaves who were auctioned off during pre-Civil War times.
Site is in MyTour

Historic Old Mill District
A 12-block riverfront area extending from Herndon Street to the Embrey Dam. This district includes the ruins of 18th- and 19th-century industrial sites, some of Fredericksburg's earliest commercial ventures. Walking tour includes 11 sites.
Site is in MyTour

Site is in MyTour

Aquia Episcopal Church
The church dates from 1757 and is considered a prime example of Colonial church architecture. This National Historic Landmark is open by appointment.
Site is in MyTour

Chatham
An 18th-century plantation that was used by the Union Army as a headquarters and hospital. George Washington, Robert E. Lee, Abraham Lincoln, Clara Barton, and Walt Whitman each visited the house. During the war, it served as a communications center, artillery post and hospital. Site offers a great view of downtown Fredericksburg.
Site is in MyTour

Belmont
An 18th-century estate and art gallery formerly owned by American artist Gari Melchers. The main house is furnished with antiques; the gallery contains many of his works. The entrance to the home serves as a Stafford County information center.
Site is in MyTour

Rising Sun Tavern
A favorite meeting place of early patriots, this inn was built about 1760 by George Washington's brother, Charles. Completely restored.
Site is in MyTour

Mary Washington House
Bought by George Washington for his mother in 1772, this white frame house is furnished in 18th-century antiques and features an English garden with sundial.
Site is in MyTour

St. James House
The property on which the St. James House is built was originally part of Kenmore. George Washington purchased it from his brother-in-law, Fielding Lewis, in 1761. Eight years later he sold it to his friend and fellow burgess James Mercer.
Site is in MyTour

Hugh Mercer Apothecary Shop
Mercer was a Fredericksburg physician who served such patients as Mary Washington before he joined the Continental Army and died as a brigadier general in the Battle of Princeton.
Site is in MyTour

Back to Tourism





The Free Lance-Star fredericksburg.com 93.3 WFLS Print Innovators 96.9 The Rock 99.3 The Vibe wntx radio