The lush greenery and picturesque white home are only the beginning of this property’s exhilarating story.

Boasting approximately 50 cleared acres and 33 wooded acres, 15142 Poplar Neck Road is now on the market for $749,000. With roots dating back to the early 1800s, this portion of Sunnyside Farm in King George County is ready for its next chapter and buyer.

Before diving into this dynamic property and what makes it such a modern-day gem, one must understand and fully appreciate its unique journey throughout the past 200-plus years.

And, what a journey it has been.

Humble and historic beginnings

In 1817, Solomon James Slaughter Brown bought the pre-Revolutionary War estate known as Middleborough for himself and his wife, Lucy, for $3,000. When Mr. Brown died in 1862, he left part of his property, Sunnyside Farm, to his son, Edwin Dorsey Brown, and Edwin’s wife, Lucy A. Dickinson Quesenberry.

According to local legend, when John Wilkes Booth crossed the Potomac River after assassinating President Abraham Lincoln in 1865, he stopped at Sunnyside Farm, where Edwin’s aunt, Alice Quesenberry, provided Booth with some food.

To this day, it’s not 100 percent clear whether Alice was a Booth sympathizer or was simply helping a stranger in need. On the grounds today, surrounded by a white fence, is a small cemetery with Edwin and Alice’s graves.

For 55 years, Edwin and Lucy lived at the estate until their deaths in the early 1900s. They were both prominent members of the Methodist church and Edwin was active in the military. He enlisted in the 9th Virginia Regiment, Company C, at the outbreak of the Civil War. He was wounded in the Battle of Fredericksburg and was ultimately discharged in 1865.

In 1940, Edwin’s son, Frederick, passed away and George Lee McKenney purchased the property to live on with his wife, Ida, and daughter, Georgia Ann.

So much of what Sunnyside Farm has topographically become may be traced back to the McKenney family. George was a successful farmer and cleared five fingers of land into the woods behind the property’s large principal field, all of which is visibly thriving today.

Georgia Ann married Devanent “Phil” Phillips in 1952. The pair lived on the grounds for 50 years and had two children, George Bruce and Alice.

In 2007, Alice married retired Navy Capt. Paul Stanton and the two currently live on a 32-acre parcel adjacent to the current property for sale.

Alice and Paul are now selling—by owner—this cherished part of their family and King George history. They look forward to welcoming their new neighbors to the neighborhood.

Today’s landscape

With a quiet stream running along its northern end and acres upon acres primed for farming, describing the estate as “scenic” simply doesn’t do the Poplar Neck Road property justice.

“It was a really nice place to grow up,” said current owner, Alice Stanton. “When I was little, I recall it being a thriving farm with 10 horses, 20 hogs, a hundred cattle and more than 200 chickens. When my grandfather bought the land from the Browns in the 1940s, he farmed it and it was full of soybeans. At one point in its history, it was a tomato farm, too. There is just so much you can do with it.”

An outdoor utopia, the land is regularly frequented by deer and turkey and, in the current owners’ opinions, could easily be optimized for horse enthusiasts.

“The way the fields are—which are currently being mowed on a regular basis—it could make for such a beautiful horse farm,” said Paul Stanton.

A farmhouse built in 1856 anchors the vast land. It boasts two stories as well as a full basement, with two total bedrooms and one bath throughout. Among its features are two, solid brick chimneys—with fireplaces branching into its main floor kitchen, living room and dining room. There are fireplaces in each of the upstairs bedrooms and in the basement, too.

Hardwood, native timber floors and high ceilings stretch throughout, and the home is serviced by a water well and boiler heating system. A number of antiques, including one-of-a-kind mirrors and wood pieces, are negotiable and available for purchase as part of the home’s sale.

“We could certainly see someone adding an addition to the home, restoring it or, perhaps, building an all-new home on another portion of the land,” Paul Stanton said.

Land near the existing home includes two weathered barns—perfect for storing tractors and equipment. Almond and dogwood trees and flowers may be easily seen from the home as well as towering hedges lining each side of its front walk.

“The lay of the land is beautiful and I fell in love with it as soon as I saw it,” said Paul Stanton. “I’ve never seen an estate as pretty as this one in the county and I can see why my wife is so proud to have grown up here.”

While certainly quiet and serene, 15142 Poplar Neck Road is well connected to all the broader region has to offer. The home is 2.5 miles from U.S. 301, five miles from State Route 3, about 10 miles from Dahlgren and 12 miles from U.S. 17.

For families, the home is in the King George County school district, including Potomac Elementary School, King George Middle School and King George High School.

Prospective buyers are encouraged to reach out to Paul and Alice Stanton directly for a showing at 540/295-0001 or sanjac56@me.com.

PHOTOS: Sunnyside Farm in King George hits the market

Boasting approximately 50 cleared acres and 33 wooded acres, 15142 Poplar Neck Road is now on the market for $749,000. With roots dating back to the early 1800s, this portion of Sunnyside Farm in King George County is ready for its next chapter and buyer.

  • 0

With roots dating back to the early 1800s, a portion of Sunnyside Farm in King George County is for sale.

  • 0

On the grounds today, surrounded by a white fence, is a small family cemetery.

  • 0

A farmhouse built in 1856 anchors the vast land. It boasts two stories as well as a full basement, with two total bedrooms and one bath throughout. 

  • 0

The main floor kitchen includes one of several fireplaces in the home.

  • 0

The home features hardwood floors throughout.

  • 0

Stairs lead to the second floor of the home, which also has a basement.

  • 0

A number of antiques, including one-of-a-kind mirrors and wood pieces, are negotiable and available for purchase as part of the home’s sale.

  • 0

The estate includes trees, shrubs and flowers.

  • 0

Legend says that Alice Quesenberry gave food to John Wilkes Booth on his flight after assassinating President Abraham Lincoln.

  • 0

Paul Stanton says he can envision someone building an addition to the old farmhouse. 

Load comments