Falmouth is just across the Rappahannock River from the city of Fredericksburg and has a similar feel.

Live: Paul Eakin, who owns the 200-year-old Amy’s Cafe building in Falmouth, thinks the small, historical hamlet just across the river from the city of Fredericksburg is the perfect place to live. Eakin has owned the building for eight years and lives in an upstairs apartment with his wife, Jenny.

“There is so much history, it’s a hidden gem,” he said of Falmouth.

For Eakin, a commercial real estate agent with Keller Williams Superior Realty, living in Falmouth is about embracing a lifestyle of outdoor activities along the Rappahannock River.

Work: Amy’s Cafe, which has been located at 103 W. Cambridge St since 2007, embraces that outdoor style of living with ample sidewalk seating. But Eakin said he thinks the addition of another restaurant would attract more people, and make Falmouth a destination.

Other businesses, such as the recently opened Wine and Design, are taking advantage of the historical charm in Falmouth. Owner Michelle Flynn said the availability of parking sealed her interest in Falmouth over the city.

Another commercial property, a historic house just across the street from Amy’s, is available.

M.C. Moncure, marketing manager with Stafford County’s department of economic development and tourism, said she thinks “something art-focused, a little quirky” could have a future there.

Play: The Eakins, beside eating at Amy’s Cafe and going to the river, take advantage of Falmouth’s trail network. From the commercial center of the historic port, one trail leads to Chatham Manor, the Georgian-style home completed in 1771 is now headquarters of Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania National Military Park.

Eventually, according to Moncure, those trails will link to Ferry Farm.

She also touted the Gari Melchers Home and Studio at Belmont as a Falmout attraction. It features the historic house, artist’s studio, restored gardens and nature trails. The museum is also home to the Stafford County visitor center.

“People drive by but never look here, and things could be developed to make it thrive again,” said Eakin, who envisions a small town but with the feel of Fredericksburg across the river.

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​Lindley Estes: 540.735-1976

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